Collection boxes

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There are several ways of using collecting boxes to raise funds – in pubs, shops and offices; through street collections, by house-to-house collections etc. Some involve more time and effort than others.

Collections

Collection Boxes can prove to be a low effort and useful way of making funds. You may like to join with others in organising a street collection, or you may know of a shop, pub etc. where the manager will allow you to leave your box.

‘Pop-up’ MEA collecting boxes for your loose change or those of more traditional, sturdier construction can be ordered from our office.

Street Collections

Raising money or selling goods for charity in streets or public places usually requires a permit or licence from either the appropriate Local Authority or, if the collection takes place in London, the local Police or the Common Council of the City of London. there may also be local regulations in force, so please find out. Permission is not usually difficult to obtain, but if you are intending to hold a street collection you will need to apply well in advance – there is a lot of competition from other fundraisers and Local Councils often have their collection days booked far into the future.

When planning a street collection, be aware that some shopping precincts (large and small) are privately owned so, if you want to include them, you’ll need to make an additional application; it’s also as well to be aware that some shops do not like you to stand too close to their doors in case their customers feel pressured.

House-to-house collections, visits to pubs, factories etc.

These must have a licence or an exemption. Licences are granted by either the appropriate Local Authority or if the collection is in London, the local Police or the Common Council of the City of London. The local Police may grant an exemption for a local collection to be completed over a short period.

The term ‘collection’ includes visits from house to house, and also visits to public houses, offices and factories to appeal for money, property items (for example clothes) or to sell things on the basis that part of the proceeds will go to a charity.