About ME

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AboutThis section provides an overview of the illness known as ME/CFS and is intended as a starting point if you are unfamiliar with the condition and its history. ME is the common name for Myalgic Encephalopathy, sometimes also known as Myalgic Encephalomyelitis. CFS is the common name for Chronic Fatigue Syndrome. This section should be read by anybody who is affected by ME/CFS – whether directly or indirectly. If you require information in a professional capacity, such as a doctor or solicitor, then please write to our Head Office at Buckingham.

The ME Association does not endorse or recommend any particular treatment, therapy or practitioner.

What is ME/CFS?

It should be explained that there are a number of different names for what is an illness of uncertain cause affecting many thousands of people. Currently it is estimated that some 250,000 people in Britain are affected by this illness… read more

The symptoms and diagnosis of ME/CFS

The following is provided for your information only. The diagnosis of ME/CFS should be determined only by a suitably qualified medical professional.

Despite the fact that the Department of Health now accepts ME/CFS as a genuine medical condition, diagnosis can still pose a problem because ME/CFS symptoms are similar to those present in a number of other medical conditions. In addition, there are no examination findings which can confirm the diagnosis. This means there has to be a process of elimination (the exclusion of other conditions) before a diagnosis of ME/CFS can be made… read more

The treatment of ME/CFS

The illness has an individual element – your particular version is probably not the same as anyone else’s in all its respects. As a result, you may find that a treatment that relieves particular symptom(s) for someone else may not do the same for you – indeed it could even make you feel worse. On the other hand, something which someone else found to be of little use could be useful for you. Both mainstream and complementary medicine practitioners have some ideas which you could consider… read more

Complementary treatments

Though there is an increasing body of evidence to show the benefits of complementary medicine many of the reports of complementary treatments are anecdotal – that doesn’t mean that they don’t work for particular individuals, it means that no formal medical evidence has been independently collected and approved by the medical community in general. It is an area of great controversy… read more